Johnson’s chair: Well-worn history from top to bottom

Johnson’s chair: Well-worn history from top to bottom

  The supporter of countless bottoms during its lifetime, this chair shows the wear and tear of many generations of everyday use. Plank chairs, such as this one, were popular utilitarian pieces of furniture during the mid-1800s. They were made in both rural and urban areas by furniture makers who utilized faster, mechanized reproduction methods. …

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Annie McCormick’s silver flower bowl: From birthday gift to artifact

Annie McCormick’s silver flower bowl: From birthday gift to artifact

  This silver flower bowl, a birthday gift for the matriarch of the McCormick family, is decorated with elaborate scenes from Rosegarden, the family’s country estate. Collections Advancement Project Curator Amy Frey nominated the bowl for this week’s Pennsylvania Treasure. Made by S. Kirk and Sons of Baltimore, the flower bowl is covered in a …

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Macabre jewelry rooted in human hair

Macabre jewelry rooted in human hair

  This week’s Pennsylvania Treasure is a collection of jewelry made from human hair. While we might consider it macabre today, the wearing of hair jewelry in Victorian society was accepted and embraced as a physical reminder of death. Museum collections today contain necklaces, earrings, bracelets, rings, lockets, brooches and even wreaths. The use of …

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Wood-carved eagle stares down Pennsylvania history

Wood-carved eagle stares down Pennsylvania history

  When inventorying a museum’s collection, one uncovers some amazing objects. Some items are so small and precious that they get hidden away for safety’s sake. Other artifacts radiate a presence that is noticed as soon as one walks into a room. Some of those objects even seem to stare at you….literally. Such is the …

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