Border dispute paves way for the Mason-Dixon Line

Border dispute paves way for the Mason-Dixon Line

Originally 5 feet tall and weighing roughly 600┬áhundred pounds, this stone was cut from a limestone quarry in Portland, England. The stone, and others like it, were shipped to the American colonies and installed every five miles along what is now known as the Mason-Dixon Line. Each stone was inscribed with the Penn family crest …

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Schrank: From ordinary to exceptional thanks to a little sulfur

Schrank: From ordinary to exceptional thanks to a little sulfur

In late 18th century Pennsylvania, a technique using sulfur inlay to decorate furniture sprang up around Lancaster County. This beautiful and unique approach is visible in the construction of this schrank, a Pennsylvania German variation of the French armoire now on exhibit in Pennsylvania Icons at The State Museum. Typically, schranks stored clothing, extra linens …

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Could this be one of the most dangerous toys ever made?

Could this be one of the most dangerous toys ever made?

This Chemcraft Master Laboratory set afforded a good lesson in managing hazardous materials found in museum collections. When the toy was discovered to contain uranium samples, the set was isolated from other artifacts and workspaces until environmental authorities could be notified. The only way to prove whether radiation was present was through the use of …

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