Schrank: From ordinary to exceptional thanks to a little sulfur

Schrank: From ordinary to exceptional thanks to a little sulfur

In late 18th century Pennsylvania, a technique using sulfur inlay to decorate furniture sprang up around Lancaster County. This beautiful and unique approach is visible in the construction of this schrank, a Pennsylvania German variation of the French armoire now on exhibit in Pennsylvania Icons at The State Museum. Typically, schranks stored clothing, extra linens …

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Carving out a seat at the Reinhart factory

Carving out a seat at the Reinhart factory

In 1872, furniture craftsmen employed by George Reinhart Steam Chair & Cabinet Factory created this green-painted, wooden chair. German immigrant Martin Reinhart founded the factory in Hazleton, Pa. in 1840. In addition to the factory, Reinhart also operated a retail furniture store at the same location. The operations were the first of its kind in …

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Small-scale collection measures up in the classroom

Small-scale collection measures up in the classroom

This collection of miniature wooden furniture, the largest of which stands 4 ¾ inches tall by 8 ½ inches wide, was handcrafted and painted by workers employed under the Work Projects Administration’s Museum Extension Project. Each piece is stamped with the project’s logo and bears a tag identifying the name of the object. Established in …

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The governors’ billiard rack: A side pocket to Pennsylvania history

The governors’ billiard rack: A side pocket to Pennsylvania history

Nominated by Collections Advancement Project curator, Carol Buck, this week’s Pennsylvania Treasure is a billiard rack used by Pennsylvania’s governors. The unique piece of furniture was originally housed at the Old Executive Mansion, built in 1864.  Often referred to as Keystone Hall, the mansion was located on Front Street in Harrisburg until its demolition in …

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