Preventing polio: A grateful nation honors Dr. Jonas Salk

Preventing polio: A grateful nation honors Dr. Jonas Salk

For many children in the 1940s and 1950s, the polio disease was an ever-present fear. Prior to the 1950s, the main option for treatment was an iron lung, a machine that used negative air pressure to mimic natural breathing. The iron lung compensated for paralyzed respiratory muscles damaged by the poliovirus. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who …

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Pennsylvania Icons: Your top 5 treasures

Pennsylvania Icons: Your top 5 treasures

On Sunday, Nov. 8, The State Museum of Pennsylvania will open to the public Pennsylvania Icons, a landmark exhibit showcasing nearly 400 artifacts, many of which have not been displayed in decades, that tells the story of the commonwealth, its people and the role they played in shaping the nation. In the past, only a …

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Settlers rebel against hard-to-swallow whiskey tax

Settlers rebel against hard-to-swallow whiskey tax

Selected by CAP curator Jennifer Gleim and appearing this fall in the upcoming Pennsylvania Icons exhibit, this receipt recalls a tumultuous time in the early history of the United States. The Whiskey Rebellion and President George Washington’s subsequent response was the first test of the newly-formed government’s authority to both levy taxes and pass and …

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In Washington’s army, buttons signaled how they served

In Washington’s army, buttons signaled how they served

When Gen. George Washington took command of the Continental Army in 1775, regulations regarding soldier uniforms did not exist. Generally, enlisted men wore whatever they owned, resulting in many variations in color and material. An unofficial standard was the linen hunting shirt, which many men at this time would have owned. In 1779, Congress passed …

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